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Evolution to Eco Ninjas

Warwick Med está liderando el cambio de gorras de teatro desechables a "sombreros reutilizables para nombres y roles". Ya estamos viendo resultados positivos con la moral del personal mejorada y la ansiedad de los pacientes reducida, ya que todos pueden identificar cómodamente a las personas que los rodean. Nuestra misión es mejorar las comunicaciones entre los profesionales sanitarios y los pacientes compartiendo las mejores prácticas y promoviendo los numerosos beneficios de nuestros tapones personalizados reutilizables.

Warwick Med Logo

By Warwick Med Ltd

Surgeon with reusable hat and face mask, by Eco ninjas
Surgeon with reusable hat and face mask, by Eco ninjas
Nurse with reusable embroidered hat and face mask, by Eco ninjas
Nurse with reusable badge hat and face mask, by Eco ninjas
Nurse with reusable badge hat and face mask, by Eco ninjas
Nurse with reusable badge hat and face mask, by Eco ninjas

Warwick Med está liderando el cambio de gorras de teatro desechables a "sombreros reutilizables para nombres y roles". Ya estamos viendo resultados positivos con la moral del personal mejorada y la ansiedad de los pacientes reducida, ya que todos pueden identificar cómodamente a las personas que los rodean. Nuestra misión es mejorar las comunicaciones entre los profesionales sanitarios y los pacientes compartiendo las mejores prácticas y promoviendo los numerosos beneficios de nuestros tapones personalizados reutilizables.

History of theatre attire

After World War One and the Spanish flu epidemic of 1918, the use of caps, face masks and rubber gloves, in addition to the white gowns, became common attire for surgeons and their assistants in the operating theatre. The purpose of the mask was to protect the surgeon from the patient’s diseases, rather than protecting the patient from infections, but these additional accessories were not universally worn.

By the 1940s, advances in aseptic techniques and a better understanding of wound infection meant more stringent measures became routine, to reduce the spread of germs in the operating theatre. Along with the sterilisation of instruments and dressings, having a standard surgical uniform was an element in the battle to prevent post-operative infections. 

 

White is the colour we associate with cleanliness and was originally used for surgical gowns. Unfortunately, the bright operating lights in an all-white environment caused eyestrain. By the 1960s, most hospitals had moved to gowns in shades of green to provide a visual contrast. Originally known as ‘surgical greens’, they came to be called ‘scrubs’ because they are worn in a ‘scrubbed’ or sterile environment.

Surgical attire had largely evolved to its modern state in the 1970s. Scrubs are unisex two-piece outfits consisting of a short-sleeve V-necked shirt and drawstring trousers made of cotton/polyester; designed to be comfortable and durable. They can withstand laundering at high temperatures for sterilisation purposes but are easily replaced. In addition to the scrubs when operating, surgeons wear a surgical gown with tie-back or bouffant-style cap to cover their hair, a face mask, latex gloves, and clog-like rubber theatre shoes. We have come a long way from the blood-stained frock coat!

Isaac, 2018, Royal College of Surgeons of England.

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